Author Topic: Making gaskets  (Read 1046 times)

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Offline Brooklands

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Making gaskets
« on: December 19, 2011, 06:47:08 PM »
This thread is dedicated to Biggles and all those Members who hate making gaskets! Lots of ways to make gaskets, and I've tried many, with ball bearings, hammers, scissors and all have been pretty poor. The thread follows on from how to make your own wad punches. The problem areas I've had are making round holes (by stabbing with scissors), cutting the inner shape, and getting the holes of the right size in the right place - all pretty basic to making a success of the job! This method works for me - but add your tips please!
1. Get a flat board (MDF, ply, kitchen cutting board) and secure your gasket sheet with tape.
2. Put casting on sheet, not near edge and draw around casting.
3. Use pointed pins that are a snug fit down stud holes (use tubular spacers, tape etc) to mark the paper.  Remove casting. Sheet will now show an outline with dots. Highlight any holes on the paper that may need an odd size cutter.
4.Use slightly oversize wad punch centered on the dots, changing punch dia where necessary.
5.Take sheet off board and offer up to casting to make sure all holes are where they should be.
5. Use wax crayon to mark around inner rim of casting and put gasket in place & locate with studs/bolts/pencils. Run finger firmly over paper surface along inner casting edge. This will transfer the crayon line.
6. Cut out gasket - make some extra holes if you need an entry point for scissors or for tight curves. However scissors don't do much of a job and are best avoided - a scalpel (Swann Morton or Daler) will cut a really good line (make sure you're not on a 'real' timber board, otherwise the blade follows the grain underneath the sheet). Have your oilstone nearby and regularly run the blade over it. When using the scalpel hold the paper 'upwind' with your spare hand and draw the blade towards you, unless you're adept at sewing.
7. Cut the outer shape last, the excess has helped to keep the whole gasket in shape, and offcuts can be used for smaller items.
8. A few small dots of Prittstick will locate the gasket, but will peel away without damaging the paper.
If you store your gaskets, put them in an old book indoors - if you hang them up in the shed they'll absorb moisture and grow - if they do then dry out (iron, microwave etc) to shrink back to size.

Joe

Norfolk 'n good!

Offline Brooklands

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Re: Making gaskets
« Reply #1 on: December 19, 2011, 06:48:37 PM »
And more
Norfolk 'n good!

Offline Brooklands

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Re: Making gaskets
« Reply #2 on: December 19, 2011, 06:49:15 PM »
And finally
Norfolk 'n good!

Offline Brooklands

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Re: Making gaskets
« Reply #3 on: December 19, 2011, 06:56:29 PM »
Oh, and the bit at the bottom shows what a crap job scissors do when cutting out! :(
Joe

Norfolk 'n good!

Offline Biggles

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Re: Making gaskets
« Reply #4 on: January 03, 2012, 07:45:27 PM »
Brookland
Just picked up on this as ever very helpful

Biggles
1954 C11G Based in Gloucestershire

Offline Adam_R

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Re: Making gaskets
« Reply #5 on: September 29, 2014, 07:25:56 PM »
ive had good success with curved scissors

Online Owen

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Re: Making gaskets
« Reply #6 on: September 30, 2014, 05:55:32 PM »
Good Job.

The only thing I would add is to grease the gasket prior to fitting to make it slide and adjust to the right position when clamped. Oh and oil tight!

1940 C12 (350cc)
1945 C10 & C11
1953 C10 & C11