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Author Topic: TLS adjustment  (Read 612 times)

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Online timsdad

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TLS adjustment
« on: December 29, 2013, 10:21:31 AM »

There are different types of twin-leading-shoe brakes but, basically, you adjust them like drum brakes on cars and trucks that have separate adjusters for each shoe. On a bike, first you need to slacken off the wheel spindle and brake steady, do both adjusters up quite hard, and then pull the brake on as well, to centralise the shoes on the drum. Tighten up the spindle etc, then let both adjusters off just enough so the wheel spins with no chuffing and adjust one of them back up so it just drags a bit. Do the same with the other shoe, so it drags the wheel a bit more, and let it off just enough so it feels the same as the first one.

Pull the brake on hard a few times and repeat the process of adjusting the two shoes so the wheel spins reasonable well but there's a bit of chuffing from both shoes. This will disappear when the drum warms up and expands.

On the much maligned BSA-Triumph conical drum brake of the early seventies the hidden adjusters are turned through a hole in the drum. A lot of owners don't know this and just take up the slack in the cable and then slag the brake off for their own incompetence. Other TLS brakes are adjusted by doing the first shoe on its own with the cable adjuster and then altering the length of the threaded link to bring the second shoe in. Some brakes have a rod with easier left-and-right threads to the clevises and some have separate cables to each shoe but they're all adjusted by the same method.

If you can't get a decent brake then the drum may need skimming because it's distorted or the shoes could need turning down to the same profile as the drum. Many folk have this done unneccessarily because brakes will usually take a good 500 miles of use to bed in. Some owners do less than this each year so the poor old brake is just continually going through the process of bedding in and glazing up again. Firm and regular use will keep most old BSA brakes in good order. It's also worth noting that re-spoking can pull a hub-and-drum assembly out of true a bit so, if you're having it skimmed, get this done after the wheel is rebuilt and not at the easier time when the hub/drum is loose off the wheel.

Works for me!

I suppose it might be better if part of this was put under a different heading. I expect Camman Graham can do it, - he knows about that sort of thing!

Ray
« Last Edit: December 30, 2013, 10:17:01 PM by camman3 »
Just a motorcyclist.

Online camman3

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Re: TLS adjustment
« Reply #1 on: December 30, 2013, 10:28:04 PM »
Way to go Ray, my "powers" returned, and I split the topic :)
1957 C12
In sunny (sometimes) Christchurch, Dorset, UK

Online timsdad

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Re: TLS adjustment
« Reply #2 on: December 31, 2013, 03:04:00 PM »
Ta, Graham, - you'll be boiling your own eggs next!

Ray
Just a motorcyclist.

Online camman3

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Re: TLS adjustment
« Reply #3 on: December 31, 2013, 05:16:58 PM »
No....last time I tried that we had to get the Fire Brigade out  :-[
Graham
1957 C12
In sunny (sometimes) Christchurch, Dorset, UK