Author Topic: petrol pipe  (Read 468 times)

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Offline maroon1953

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petrol pipe
« on: January 01, 2016, 05:22:51 PM »
Hi all C friends,
I wish a happy new year!

I want to finish my 1953 C11 R bike soon this new year.

I want to finish tank and carb and will do the first start of the engine soon.
Is the pipe from tank to carburettor a complete  copper pipe for the 1953 model?

Michael

Online camman3

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Re: petrol pipe
« Reply #1 on: January 01, 2016, 07:44:55 PM »
Happy new year Micheal....all the c11's I have seen have copper fuel line, usually in the form of one complete loop, have a look through the gallery.
Graham
1957 C12
In sunny (sometimes) Christchurch, Dorset, UK

Online Owen

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Re: petrol pipe
« Reply #2 on: January 02, 2016, 02:23:09 PM »
See pic below of  53 C11 petrol pipework
1940 C12 (350cc)
1945 C10 & C11
1953 C10 & C11

Online Tman

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Re: petrol pipe
« Reply #3 on: January 02, 2016, 05:35:29 PM »
Copper's OK but I'm still trying to find "rubber" pipe that's ethanol-proof. The last lot of "guaranteed safe for modern fuels" piping has gone rigid in about six months (and I haven't even ridden the bike on the road yet!)

Offline timsdad

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Re: petrol pipe
« Reply #4 on: January 03, 2016, 09:58:12 AM »
I buy different sized black fuel pipe in lengths of a metre or so from my local auto factor, Mr T, and it does the job. It's printed 'petrol and diesel proof' along it in small letters but needs replacing about every year or so if pulled on and off a few times.

On my Mirage, it goes soft on the ends where it has to be pulled off the taps when the tank comes off at service time but I just trim half an inch off the end of the pipe where it's gone a bit soft and swollen. On bikes that have it clipped onto a banjo it seems to last several years, never goes hard and stays flexible.

Ray
Just a motorcyclist.

Offline maroon1953

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Re: petrol pipe
« Reply #5 on: January 04, 2016, 01:52:59 PM »
Thanks to all for helping.
Owen, your photo of the c11 is very good, better than anything I have found searching in the gallery!
No problem for me to make the copper pipe.

I can confirm Ray, there are ethanol resistant rubber pipes available. I have bought several diameter lenght at E--Y.

Michael

Online isleofmanpaul

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Re: petrol pipe
« Reply #6 on: January 04, 2016, 06:46:25 PM »
There used to  be a special "tool"/ pipe bender which was employed to bend a spiral into copper pipe.

If memory serves it comprised of a grooved drum and a "former" that prevented the pipe being kinked ( but it's possible I could be dreaming  ;D)

I have attempted to replicate the copper fuel pipe to my '38 Empire Star but it's not perfect . I had the right diameter tube commensurate with the fittings and it was an easy soldering job

Does anyone on the site (Ritchie possibly) know how to replicate the copper fuel feed  so it doesn't look too much like a 'bodge' ;D

Online Owen

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Re: petrol pipe
« Reply #7 on: January 04, 2016, 07:35:10 PM »
Best to anneal it and fill it full of sand to prevent it from kinking unlike my attempt.
1940 C12 (350cc)
1945 C10 & C11
1953 C10 & C11

Online hampshirebiker

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Re: petrol pipe
« Reply #8 on: January 04, 2016, 07:36:52 PM »
You can get an external 8mm bending spring. Coiled 8mm O/D copper tube is already anealed.
Postal - Liphook Hants - But just into West Sussex.

Offline timsdad

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Re: petrol pipe
« Reply #9 on: January 05, 2016, 06:41:50 AM »
Kunifer brake pipe, which comes in different sizes from an autofactor, is a bit softer and easier to bend than copper. I made one by doing the top bend with a small pipe bender, available from tool stalls at town markets, and then doing the coil round a big socket in the vice. It has to be finished off with the pipe bender and thumbs but is quite do-able if you persevere.

I don't think the bore is big enough to pack with sand and I should think a flexible coil round the outside would be tricky to get off again without cutting.

Ray
Just a motorcyclist.

Online Paul S

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Re: petrol pipe
« Reply #10 on: January 05, 2016, 09:07:04 AM »
Air conditioning pipe is very malleable and still comes in imperial sizes.

I just watched a "how its made" on quest about making trombones, they bend the pipes by filling them with water and freezing them before bending.
Growing old is compulsory, but growing up is optional.
1955 C12
1961 Greeves Scottish
1998 Kawasaki zzr600
1967 Triumph Vitesse 2 ltr convertible

Online Tman

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Re: petrol pipe
« Reply #11 on: January 05, 2016, 10:18:08 AM »
Yeah, I saw that. Metal-spinning the bell probably takes some skill too. Another episode shows a flute being made....nice bit of soldering required there!

Offline maroon1953

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Re: petrol pipe
« Reply #12 on: January 07, 2016, 05:32:34 PM »
Nice idea with frozen water!
The frosty weather over here in Germany is just right and I have made a test today.
I worked perfect, the spiral was very easy to make.
Tomorrow I will fix the petrol tank to have all the measures I need and will do the bend to the carb bowl.

Michael