Author Topic: C10 Project  (Read 844 times)

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Offline BSAussie

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C10 Project
« on: January 31, 2016, 09:56:45 AM »
Hi All
I have been sorting through the boxes of parts that came with the bike and it looks like I have 2 gearboxes and one engine (XC11 T.9698) all in bits besides what is on the bike.
This creates the problem of what has been removed from the gearbox on the bike and what goes where. I have been looking at the parts lists and gradually getting my head around it
My question regarding the gearbox is; as it is part dismantled is now a good time to replace anything like the brass bushes in the covers or check for wear? The gears rotate easily if I rotate the clutch but I don't know how to check if they can change.
I'll attach a photo of the gearbox as it appears now. Am I correct in thinking that the inner cover is next to go on or is there something missing.
Any suggestions on how to clean out the gear box?
Any suggestions appreciated
Cheers
Paul


« Last Edit: January 31, 2016, 10:21:51 AM by Owen »
C10 1946
MGB 1971
Jag E-type 1970

Offline chaterlea25

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Re: C10 Project
« Reply #1 on: January 31, 2016, 07:59:37 PM »
Hi Paul
The gears change by rotating the little gear on the end of the selector mechanism
I would remove and dismantle the gearbox to clean the parts and make sure all is good in there
Yes, check and replace any bronze or steel bushes that are worn

HTH
John

Offline Biggles

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Re: C10 Project
« Reply #2 on: February 01, 2016, 12:21:46 PM »
Very sensible doing this now will save a lot of heart ache later should something be amiss
1954 C11G Based in Gloucestershire

Offline BSAussie

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Re: C10 Project
« Reply #3 on: February 02, 2016, 09:24:52 PM »
Thanks for the advice. Is there any parts that are prone to wear that I should look out for. Are the bushes readily available?
C10 1946
MGB 1971
Jag E-type 1970

Online timsdad

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Re: C10 Project
« Reply #4 on: February 03, 2016, 07:15:04 AM »
These gearboxes are very robust and give little trouble in normal use - perhaps the occasional broken spring or whatever.

If it was mine, Paul, I'd remove the box and strip the rest of it out, clean everything up on a wire wheel, wash the casing well and put it together again. It's an easy enough job, study it as you pull it apart so you can put bits back in the correct order. There is plenty of information on this site and, as has been pointed out many times, you need to spend a tenner on an instruction book.

The first thing I'd assess, though, is why the previous owner removed the inner cover. Something must have gone wrong for that to happen but, sometimes, previous owners do strange things! They have a lot to answer for.

Ray
Just a motorcyclist.

Online Owen

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Re: C10 Project
« Reply #5 on: February 03, 2016, 12:46:03 PM »
In the BSA service sheet is a list of the bearing sizes for the different models. But as others say have a look at the bits and pieces and go from there.
1940 C12 (350cc)
1945 C10 & C11
1953 C10 & C11

Offline Tman

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Re: C10 Project
« Reply #6 on: February 03, 2016, 01:32:36 PM »
Personally I wouldn't replace any bush unless or until I knew it was u/s. Races are a different issue and well worth renewing, but bushes, nope.

Offline BSAussie

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Re: C10 Project
« Reply #7 on: February 13, 2016, 03:43:54 AM »
Sorry for slow reply....
Good advice, thank you.
Have ordered a workshop manual from Motorcycle Museum ( although a tenner in UK, turns into $AU40 by the time it gets here. Our dollar is like Monopoly money compared to the pound.)

Looking at parts list for gearbox there appears to be only 1 set of bearings and one oil seal to replace and a few gaskets. Or am I missing something? I've never tackled a gear box before, but it looks straightforward.

I did find a broken footchange return spring in the bits, so this may explain why the gearbox was pulled down.

Cheers
Paul
C10 1946
MGB 1971
Jag E-type 1970

Online timsdad

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Re: C10 Project
« Reply #8 on: February 13, 2016, 08:49:01 AM »
It's a straightforward job, Paul, and nothing to worry about. On the output bearing, behind the sprocket, it's a good idea to get a replacement bearing that is fully sealed. I then tweak out the little plastic shield that's on the inside, to let the oil splash in, and leave the outer shield in place to help the separate lip seal to do its job.


I did my first gearbox, chucked in at the deep end, when I was sixteen. My mate rang me up one Saturday evening to go and give him a hand with his Tiger Cub. I was horrified to find all the gearbox internals laying in a heap on a bit of newspaper because he's pulled the cover off to fix a bit of an oil leak. The shafts had all come away with the cover and everything had tumbled out onto the wash house floor. Keith wasn't much good with Meccano sets or Airfix kits so I had to figure it all out and it took several attempts, and to about midnight, until it would go up and down the gears so we could put the oil back in.

We had no instruction book so it was just suck it and see. I was just so pleased to hear that little bike thrash off up the street and go slickly up through the gears. I counted them all out and I counted them all back in!

Ray
Just a motorcyclist.

Offline BSAussie

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Re: C10 Project
« Reply #9 on: February 14, 2016, 04:01:57 AM »
Thanks for the words of encouragement Ray.
I got started,but didn't get far.
Is there any off the shelf extracter to use in place of service tool  61-3362 to allow removal of the clutch plate and to remove the collar on the engine drive shaft, which will allow removal of the chain case?
I have a bit to learn about bike tools.
I have attached a photo to clarify.
Cheers
Paul

C10 1946
MGB 1971
Jag E-type 1970

Online MilitaryRon

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Re: C10 Project
« Reply #10 on: February 14, 2016, 05:46:29 AM »
It should just pull/wiggle off the spline.  Ron

Online timsdad

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Re: C10 Project
« Reply #11 on: February 14, 2016, 09:03:49 AM »
If it's tight then a couple of screwdrivers, or short, thin tyre levers, will probably wriggle it off. If not, then a bit of heat can work wonders, Paul, and maybe a tap with a hammer and the third best screwdriver.

There's a peg tool available to fit the engine shaft nut and I made my own out of a big old socket with four little pegs welded on. These pegs started life as Allen keys and were ground to be a nice fit in the nut slots first.

It's now frowned on by the purists but, for many years, I used the method recommended by BSA in their instruction manuals. This is to use a soft, brass punch and lump hammer to thump the nut tight or to loosen it. I'm still happy to use this method sometimes if that unhelpful previous owner has carved the nut up a bit with his cold chisel and coal hammer. It gets the job done and no one can see the butchery when the casing is back on.

Ray
Just a motorcyclist.

Online Owen

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Re: C10 Project
« Reply #12 on: February 14, 2016, 09:17:51 AM »
Ron,
Its a taper shaft on the pre G/L models.
1940 C12 (350cc)
1945 C10 & C11
1953 C10 & C11

Online MilitaryRon

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Re: C10 Project
« Reply #13 on: February 14, 2016, 09:50:41 AM »
Yep of course Owen. Worked on too many clutches to remember them all. But apart from a special tool that I made for compressing the spring on my M20 clutch, I have no special tools or pullers for removing them. I use Ray's method.

I also have some special sockets that Ray described. which added to my new rattle gun make undoing and doing up the nuts a doddle!  Ron

Offline chaterlea25

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Re: C10 Project
« Reply #14 on: February 14, 2016, 08:19:09 PM »
Hi,
There's an internal thread in the clutch shaft adaptor, to take a threaded puller
I cannot remember if this extractor is the same one used on the bigger BSA, A & B models ??

John