Author Topic: Clutch plates  (Read 473 times)

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Online Owen

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Re: Clutch plates
« Reply #30 on: December 30, 2018, 10:37:53 pm »
Someone posted a year or so back, with a company who sell sheets of Cork and they made a template to cut them out. I think they could only get one thickness from what I remember.
1940 C12 (350cc)
1945 C10 & C11
1953 C10 & C11
Anyone want a B20 in need of a lot of tlc

Offline chaterlea25

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Re: Clutch plates
« Reply #31 on: December 30, 2018, 11:14:05 pm »
Hi Owen and All,
Cork sheet is usually reconstituted from particles, this will fall apart in use,
The cork needs to be "solid"

John

Online MilitaryRon

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Re: Clutch plates
« Reply #32 on: December 31, 2018, 06:53:46 am »
Yes this was the reason given to me on the price increase by the new owners of the clutch corking business. They said that the previous owners have for years been using their old stocks of cork sheeting. When the new owners bought new sheets, they found out the real price of the stuff......Hence the 300% price hike.

I'm not sure if Andy is suggesting I cut some out from old wine bottle corks? But to quote the old adage...." Life's to short to stuff a mushroom"   

Ron

Offline Brillandy

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Re: Clutch plates
« Reply #33 on: December 31, 2018, 09:50:35 am »
My final words on this subject!   ::)

My post on the first page of this thread pointed to my Technical Tip for recorking:  https://bsac10c11c12.co.uk/smf/technical-tips/clutch-plate-re-cork/   This not only shows how easy it is to do, it also has a link to a supplier of cork in both 6 & 12mm 12"x4" sheets ('splits') that is not re-constituted:  http://www.charlescantrill.com/cork-products/misc/shoe-cork/

If you would rather pay someone else to do this simple job, then that's up to you!

Andy
56 C10L
60 Nuffield DM4

Online MilitaryRon

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Re: Clutch plates
« Reply #34 on: December 31, 2018, 10:10:55 am »
Apologies Andy! I totally missed all that. I would have to check in a minute but I think 6mm might be too thick for the 3 Triumph plates (total 72 inserts) I'll see if his 3mm is about right. Cheers Ron

Offline Ginge

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Re: Clutch plates
« Reply #35 on: December 31, 2018, 12:04:55 pm »
I re-corked my clutch with wine bottle corks using a jig like Andy has made.  A little bit different because he used sheet cork and I used round.

The wine bottle corks delivered a nice clutch but fell apart after about six months occasional use.  I had to dredge them out of the bottom of the primary case in tiny fragments.  John correctly points out that reconstituted cork is not up to the job.  Not every wine bottle cork is a good one. Some are made from cork bits...

I'd be prepared to give the new synthetic wine bottle corks a go.  It's not a difficult process.  In reality I'd probably go for a synthetic plate from a vendor.  Even if it was a bit thinner.  I could add another plain plate to make up the difference.

Ron,  I think 3mm sheet cork might be a bit skinny to make the inserts because once you fill the plate you need to spin it and dress the high spots off with a sander or similar.  I'd go with 6mm and spin it down.  Or just buy the Surflex ones and be prepared to add another plate.

Ginge
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Online MilitaryRon

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Re: Clutch plates
« Reply #36 on: December 31, 2018, 12:41:10 pm »
My problem all along has been the new replacement Sureflex plates that I fitted keep slipping when kicking through compression, even with new springs and an extra plate. I've just been doing some comparison measurements. The new Surflex are 4mm and the old cork plates are around 3.7-3.8mm. So 3mm cork is not thick enough, whereas 6mm will add 6mm to the stack which is then beyond the clutch center splines, and I don't fancy trying to evenly sand 1mm off them.

But now I'm thinking about the oil that I used. The book says 3/4 pint of SAE 10 (there is no level plug on these)  I used multi-grade 10w-30 as I already have some under the bench. But speaking to a Triumph expert and the previous owner, both tell me that the book spec is debatable and a possible typo. More like 1/3 pint and thin oil or TQF.

I'm still intrigued to know what the other plates 57-0414 at Drags are?  Ron

Offline Ginge

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Re: Clutch plates
« Reply #37 on: December 31, 2018, 01:21:44 pm »
Ron,

My C slips on the kick start as well no matter how much I clean the plates or adjust the clutch.  My next step is to go the Triumph way and only use primary oil with an SF rating or earlier.  I have been using ATF but will stop that.

I run two '70's Triumphs that share engine oil with primary case.  They "mist breath" through three little holes under the primary side crank bearing. Use the wrong engine oil and you slip the clutch.  Use SF or earlier and all is well.
Ginge.

Offline stev60

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Re: Clutch plates
« Reply #38 on: December 31, 2018, 07:46:33 pm »
Surflex plates are great ive managed to fit two into both C11 and C10, one possible down side is they dont seem to like oil like the cork does, I just spray chain lube through inspection hole. On an A7 with surflex plates I used auto transmission oil, slipped straight away, so just use the same spray method works for me, and no leaks.
Steve

Offline chaterlea25

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Re: Clutch plates
« Reply #39 on: December 31, 2018, 08:14:31 pm »
Hi All,
Like everything else there's ATF and there's ATF
You need to get the correct type, some are made to assist slip
I can't remember the right one now  :(
I use motorcycle oil for wet clutch engines 10//30
I have friends who have moved to using Harley D primary oil in their vintage bike primaries and report good results

John

Online timsdad

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Re: Clutch plates
« Reply #40 on: January 01, 2019, 08:31:09 am »
I didn't know that ATF could have friction-inhibitor additive in, John, I'll have to keep an eye on that in future. I buy mine in 5 litre cans from my local motor factor, used to be in 25 litre cans but I don't use so much nowadays, and have never had a problem in primary cases.

If I use engine oil round the clutch then it has to be similar to what I use in my wet-sump bikes - no inhibitor. I've never had a clutch problem caused by ATF or engine oil, only a bit of slip caused by too much oil in there for whatever reason. This is always cured by washing the plates in petrol and keeping the oil to, or below, the correct level. Works for me.


Ray
Just a motorcyclist.

Online MilitaryRon

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Re: Clutch plates
« Reply #41 on: January 01, 2019, 09:11:26 am »
That's what I've elected to do Ray. Clean plates and low ATF in the case. But I'll wait to see what they say at Bungay. Ron

Offline Tman

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Re: Clutch plates
« Reply #42 on: January 01, 2019, 09:22:10 am »
If I remember correctly the ATF specified by Ford is the one to use.

Online MilitaryRon

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Re: Clutch plates
« Reply #43 on: January 01, 2019, 10:08:05 am »
Blimey! I never thought I'd be concerning myself with the grade of automatic transmission fluid to put in my 79 year old primary case.  :-\ Ron

Offline Pat

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Re: Clutch plates
« Reply #44 on: January 01, 2019, 01:08:49 pm »
Ford Type F atf was thicker than more common atf's. Chev racers used to use it to give more positive shift points.