Author Topic: Cyclon Batteries  (Read 253 times)

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Offline Pete

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Cyclon Batteries
« on: October 11, 2018, 01:00:58 PM »
Am I expecting too much for a 7 year old Cyclon battery to recover from being dead flat for the past 3 years?
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Online hampshirebiker

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Re: Cyclon Batteries
« Reply #1 on: October 11, 2018, 01:39:58 PM »
Put it on charge and you'll find out.
Postal - Liphook Hants - But just into West Sussex.

Offline MilitaryRon

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Re: Cyclon Batteries
« Reply #2 on: October 11, 2018, 01:53:47 PM »
It will be knackered Pete! They seem to hold their charge whilst being left untouched over several winters.....And then they just die. But at £20 for a 5ah and about £27 for an 8ah off Mick Ash, they are bloody good value for money.......and no acid corrosion. Ron

Offline Pete

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Re: Cyclon Batteries
« Reply #3 on: October 11, 2018, 01:55:40 PM »
I have. One wdidn't charge at all, one got 2v, the other about 5v. I'm trying with a different charger. The one I used was a small Lidl charger that may not be man enough to kick them back to life?
1948 BSA C11
1932/56 C12Rudge
N.B. Andromeda
Volvo V40

Offline Pete

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Re: Cyclon Batteries
« Reply #4 on: October 11, 2018, 01:57:50 PM »
Sounds like I might have to invest then Ron. I'll leave it now til next Spring. I'll still see what happens on better charger.
1948 BSA C11
1932/56 C12Rudge
N.B. Andromeda
Volvo V40

Online hampshirebiker

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Re: Cyclon Batteries
« Reply #5 on: October 11, 2018, 02:01:27 PM »
If an Optimate doesn't work, chuck it. Or just chuck it. ;D
Postal - Liphook Hants - But just into West Sussex.

Offline Owen

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Re: Cyclon Batteries
« Reply #6 on: October 11, 2018, 05:04:27 PM »
I've tested my old cyclone on our medical battery tester.  58% and 5% after 7 years use.  No way to recover them.
1940 C12 (350cc)
1945 C10 & C11
1953 C10 & C11
Most of a B20/3 in need of a lot of tlc

Offline Pete

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Re: Cyclon Batteries
« Reply #7 on: October 11, 2018, 05:13:28 PM »
The first one I tried to charge on better charge was the newest, a Burlen one off my C12Rudge. The charger and one cell of the battery got very hot, and it showed 2 volts.
I'll buy new.
1948 BSA C11
1932/56 C12Rudge
N.B. Andromeda
Volvo V40

Offline camman3

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Re: Cyclon Batteries
« Reply #8 on: October 11, 2018, 05:25:15 PM »
If the cell has gone short circuit then it is for the bin.
I would reccomend the Noco Genius chargers, mine recovered two batteries where an Optimate wouldn't .....does 6volt, 12 volt, and lithium batteries.
https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Noco-Genius-G1100-6V-12V-Motorcycle-Battery-Charger-Maintainer-1-1Amp-NEW/113152864142?epid=7017019087&hash=item1a586faf8e

Graham
1957 C12
In sunny (sometimes) Christchurch, Dorset, UK

Online timsdad

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Re: Cyclon Batteries
« Reply #9 on: October 12, 2018, 07:10:46 AM »
Tight bugger, Pete, - just buy one now.

Delaying just means you'll have to replace it again a bit earlier in a few years time!


Ray
Just a motorcyclist.

Offline Pete

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Re: Cyclon Batteries
« Reply #10 on: October 12, 2018, 08:00:49 AM »


Delaying just means you'll have to replace it again a bit earlier in a few years time!


Ray

Are you sure you've got that the right way round?? :)
1948 BSA C11
1932/56 C12Rudge
N.B. Andromeda
Volvo V40

Offline rogerinfrance

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Re: Cyclon Batteries
« Reply #11 on: October 12, 2018, 08:03:43 AM »
I used a 50 year old battery charger that I replaced the lead on as it has 6 volt on it. The battery was quite old and the previous owner said it was US. I charged it and discharged it a couple of times with a slow discharge (4 LEDs ) and now it seems OK. The problem with all modern chargers is that they rely on what the electronics tell it where as the older ones just rely on the charge.
Incidentally I purchased one on the internet, same manufacturer, same box all holes were identical and so was the color, red, however new one had no earth as it was totally isolated, and it was now electronically controlled. Hence the return to the old one. I have several modern ones, Oxford types Optima and the like well forget them for rejuvenating old batteries. If you need to make one, get an isolation transformer, a full bridge rectifier fuse link and do it that way with a voltage out of about 14 for 12 volt and 7 for 6 volt and do that test with a large capacitor across the terminals. To reduce the voltage slightly stick a largish diode in series with the output. As a maintainer for a few days try about 13 volts or 6.5 volts. Modernity does not do it all! If you do not know which way around to put the diode then probably you should not try this but entrust to someone who can!

Offline Tman

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Re: Cyclon Batteries
« Reply #12 on: October 12, 2018, 09:22:21 AM »
Fair point. I have a newish charger as sold by Lidl and very good it is too generally speaking, but on a battery that is too low an output voltage to spark the Lidl unit into life I connect my (very) old charger across the battery in parallel which then makes the Lidl job start working (it's sensing a battery with a low voltage rather than sensing no battery at all).
Then simply disconnect the old charger leaving the Lidl one happily charging.
Works for me (as someone says!)

Online hampshirebiker

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Re: Cyclon Batteries
« Reply #13 on: October 12, 2018, 09:43:27 AM »
Yes, I always used to give a flat battery a kickstart with a car charger (correct voltage of course) for ten minutes and finish off with the smart jobby. I've recovered a few.
Postal - Liphook Hants - But just into West Sussex.

Offline camman3

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Re: Cyclon Batteries
« Reply #14 on: October 12, 2018, 09:57:23 AM »
Agreed, if a battery is completely discharged, you often need to "kickstart" it with an old charger to get some charge in it....but not for long, on SLA's  and particularly lithiums, as it will shorten their life even more, as they require more regulated and smoother charge than the old wet batteries would take.
Lithium batteries in particular, will be quickly ruined if you use wrong charger, and often wont recover at all if allowed to fully discharge, having said that, they are brilliant if treated correctly, giving at least 30% more current for size and incredibly light.
I reccomended the Noco charger as, although I got it for its lithium charging ability, it recovered two SLA's that an Optimate strangely wouldn't.
Graham
1957 C12
In sunny (sometimes) Christchurch, Dorset, UK