Author Topic: Southern Hemisphere recommissioning  (Read 697 times)

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Offline stev60

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Re: Southern Hemisphere recommissioning
« Reply #30 on: January 07, 2019, 06:24:11 pm »
Thanks Ray, I wasnt sure, I had replaced all the plates in my A7  with surflex and dry it ran perfect, tried ATF on advise and  it slipped badly.  I will get clutch back in C11 today and hopefully  it will work, ive kept a few sets of old springs and may use them, ive noticed with the new set to get the plate to move evenly there is quite a bit more thread showing on certain studs. Ive noticed the manufacture of some new parts leaves a bit to be desired, I bought a new plate to replace the one behind the chain wheel, it was nowhere near flat more like a dish, A new front axle, when I tightened it up the other end came off, it was held on by useless small screw, and a cosmetic weld, someone is obviously making this stuff, and in this case putting lives at risk, I  wont mention where I bought it, but was told it was old stock, it wasnt  it was almost made to fail. 

Offline MilitaryRon

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Re: Southern Hemisphere recommissioning
« Reply #31 on: January 08, 2019, 05:46:51 am »
I have noticed that some Asia manufacturers of parts seem confused (in their favour) about the use of the term NOS (New Old Stock).....To them, if it's newly made but for and old vehicle....It'a advertised as NOS >:(  Ron

Offline stev60

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Re: Southern Hemisphere recommissioning
« Reply #32 on: January 08, 2019, 06:28:42 am »
Ron
I am  referring to parts bought from jolly old England  who should know better to send that stuff to the colonies after we helped them out in a couple of conflicts
Steve

Online Owen

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Re: Southern Hemisphere recommissioning
« Reply #33 on: January 08, 2019, 06:56:16 am »
Irrespective of where they send it,  the goods should be of good quality. Have you complained to the company? Name and shame.
1940 C12 (350cc)
1945 C10 & C11
1953 C10 & C11
Anyone want a B20 in need of a lot of tlc

Offline MilitaryRon

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Re: Southern Hemisphere recommissioning
« Reply #34 on: January 08, 2019, 07:33:32 am »
Ron
I am  referring to parts bought from jolly old England  who should know better to send that stuff to the colonies after we helped them out in a couple of conflicts
Steve

A lot of the companies in UK that sell parts for British bikes like Draganfly and Hitchcock's and just about every jumbler and ebay dealer are sourcing them from far overseas (India, China, Mexico etc). All these overseas countries have manufacturers with the ability to produce good quality parts, so it's down to quality control on the part of the UK suppliers. It's been my unhappy experience that Draganfly are more lacking in this department than some of the others. Ron   

Offline timsdad

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Re: Southern Hemisphere recommissioning
« Reply #35 on: January 08, 2019, 08:09:54 am »
I think it's all down to price. If the importer will only pay peanuts then he gets junk. If he's prepared to pay a decent price then he'll get better quality but, as we know, that doesn't have as much profit!


I can't see how adding ATF to a good working clutch will make it slip, Steve, as the oil shouldn't get onto the plates - it's basically a 'dry' clutch with the chain just touching a puddle of oil. The centrifugal force should keep the oil out of the plates when it's splashing and dripping around. You're not making the basic error of oiling the plates on assembly, are you? They need keeping as dry as a really dry thing!


Ray
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Offline MilitaryRon

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Re: Southern Hemisphere recommissioning
« Reply #36 on: January 08, 2019, 09:24:51 am »
The Triumph manual for my 40's bikes with cork clutch plates, tell you to oil the plates before assembly with SAE 10 oil or a mix of thicker oil and paraffin. This probably doesn't apply to Surflex plates though. The debatable instruction is the capacity of 3/4 pint of oil for the chaincase??

My M20's have a complete bowler hat cover over the clutch and my Norton's clutches have a metal shield around the basket, all to keep the oil out, as these were never cork clutches.  Ron 

Offline timsdad

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Re: Southern Hemisphere recommissioning
« Reply #37 on: January 08, 2019, 04:10:59 pm »
When I was sixteen, I bought a battered old G3 Jampot Matchless with a slipping clutch for two pounds ten shillings - half a weeks wages but a bargain. The bloke that sold it to me said it just needed new clutch springs so I stripped the thing out, reassembled with five new springs at ten-pence each, still in old money back in 1965, and put it together, including oiling the plates. The clutch still slipped on the kick start so I hauled it to bits again. An old boy had a look at it for me, told me to wash the plates in petrol and it'd be fine. It was.

I've never had any great clutch problems since by putting all clutch plates together dry, in wet or dry clutches, cork or Surflex, Brit or foreign, whatever the books say. Why would they need oiling? Cars don't!


Ray
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Offline MilitaryRon

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Re: Southern Hemisphere recommissioning
« Reply #38 on: January 08, 2019, 05:42:06 pm »
I must agree with the logic Ray. Oil is slippy stuff, so why put it anywhere near a clutch?? ???  Ron

Online camman3

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Re: Southern Hemisphere recommissioning
« Reply #39 on: January 08, 2019, 05:57:46 pm »
That WAS a bargain Ray.....I paid £4 for a 350 Bullet in boxes in 1964 (albeit only two or three years old) when my first year apprentice wage was £3/1/6d per week.....for 42 hours !
Like you say, not many cars with a wet clutch.....only thing in there that needs lubrication is the thrust bearing....and in our bikes, it is the chain and clutch centre bearing, grease bearing on assembly, and spray grease on chain through filler hole every 500 miles or so will do nicely imo.....and reduce puddles on garage floor.
Graham
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Offline stev60

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Re: Southern Hemisphere recommissioning
« Reply #40 on: January 08, 2019, 06:03:27 pm »
Ok the axle I bought was from Dragonfly, I didnt realise they were sourcing some parts from overseas. The only reason I bought the axle was it had a left hand thread and I had no way of making it. Whoever made it  machined down the end opposite the thread  put a nut on with the thread machined  out  drilled a hole through both and put a small screw through and a superficial weld across the end of course it was going to fail it came off with very little pressure . Even threading the end and putting a nut on held by a decent pin would have been better. I would hate to think there are more like that out there. I did let them know and should have sent it back but just made a proper job of it to get the bike going.

Offline timsdad

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Re: Southern Hemisphere recommissioning
« Reply #41 on: January 09, 2019, 06:39:23 am »
The bloke wanted a fiver for the Matchless, Graham, he was my best mate's cousin, but it wouldn't start because of the clutch when we went to look at it so said I could have it half price. It was a bit rough, he had bought a van and was shortly getting married.


Car thrust bearings have been sealed for life for many years and should only actually turn when the clutch is pushed down. They wear out too quick, and usually shriek, when stupid drivers rest their foot on the clutch pedal between gear changes. Most trucks had a grease nipple and tube to put a pump of grease onto the shaft the carrier runs on but the bearing is sealed.

Bike bearings and the primary chain need little lube because of their clean working environment. They get plenty of lube from the oil mist to last 50,000 miles between strip downs and who does that these days?


Ray
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Offline Ginge

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Re: Southern Hemisphere recommissioning
« Reply #42 on: Today at 12:45:52 am »
Update here in sunny Central Otago...

Dynamo is back on the bike.  New wires and terminals.  New gasket and fresh grease on the sprocket side.

I ripped the clutch out again.  Flattened everything again and cleaned the oil and stuff off the plates.  Replaced the short springs I put in last year with the slightly longer ones (1/16" longer maybe).  They came out of the bike last year.  I now have three threads showing and can stand on the kick starter.

Pulled the cable out but there is no kinks in it.  Inner slides freely.  The actuating arm is sitting at about the right angle.

Clutch push rod is 9 and 1/8" long with no ball bearing anywhere except the actuating end.  That seems about right.

Clutch centre is due for replacement as the studs are not quite straight and the preening on the back of the studs has come loose.  I don't think that would make the clutch heavy though.

Anyone got an old clutch centre that might be better than mine?
Ginge.

Offline stev60

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Re: Southern Hemisphere recommissioning
« Reply #43 on: Today at 06:55:21 am »
You can repair that clutch center, get rid of all the old studs, put in new unf bolts thread them right down, and machine the heads down to give clearance, just weld them in place with a tig welder if you have one, they can be longer than originals and still clear the cover, ive also used locknuts on the inside, they may need a tap to get them straight, ive done it on two baskets because the were just falling to bits and had dodgy threads

Online Owen

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Re: Southern Hemisphere recommissioning
« Reply #44 on: Today at 07:07:40 am »
On one of my bikes the studs have been brazed and another one welded to the centre, both work fine.
1940 C12 (350cc)
1945 C10 & C11
1953 C10 & C11
Anyone want a B20 in need of a lot of tlc